Labrador Health

labrador-healthMaking sure that your Labrador stays in great health throughout his  lifetime is one of your top priorities.

Keeping your Labrador healthy

We have gathered lots of information to help you keep your Lab in tip-top condition.   In this section of the Labrador site you can find sections on:

Check out our health category Here you’ll find a collection of all our articles on Labrador health articles displayed one one page.  They cover a wide range of health topics.

You can also find articles on Fears and Phobias,  and on other behavioural problems in our Labrador Behaviour section.

What to do when your Labrador is sick

We get many questions on this website from people whose dogs are sick or injured. We are always so sorry to read about dogs that are unwell.

People send in their dog’s symptoms and most often ask about

  • Vomiting and tummy troubles
  • Limping
  • Hair loss / falling out
  • Failure to grow/thrive
  • Rashes

While we can provide information about different conditions that Labradors may suffer from, it isn’t possible for anyone, no matter how well qualified, to attempt to diagnose health problems over the internet.

Usually, the best course of action is for you to visit or telephone your own veterinary surgeon.  Some problems require more urgent treatment than others so do check out this article: When to call your vet

The diagnosis needs to be made by a qualified professional with access to your dog and his medical records.

My vet isn’t helping

Sometimes people write in because they are not happy with their vet’s diagnosis or prescription.

The answer is almost always to go back to your vet and talk to him about your concerns, or to get a second opinion.

Going back to your vet

Some vets, while brilliant with animals are not the greatest communicators with people. If your vet has not clearly explained his diagnosis (what is wrong with your dog) his prognosis (what he thinks will happen next) or his recommended treatment.  Get him to spell it out for you.  You are entitled to this information!  In plain English.

It is very common to leave a vet’s office or surgery, get home with your dog, and think of a whole load of questions you wish you had asked.  This is normal. We do it when we go to the doctor too.

Many people fail to make use of telephone consultations with their vet.  You don’t need to go to your veterinarian’s office in order to speak to him.   If you have questions to ask, or points that need clarifying, write them down and telephone him.  If he isnt available ask him to phone you back.  Many vets will do this free of charge provded you don’t make a constant habit of it.

Getting a second opinion

Even experts disagree sometimes, they are only human.  And we can’t all get on really well with everyone we meet.

marvin the mooseI think it is important that we have a good relationship with out vets, and that we understand what is going on when they treat our pets.

If your vet is a poor communicator, you are concerned about the treatment he has prescribed for your dog, or you simply don’t get along, there is nothing wrong with getting another opinion. In fact, it is the right thing to do.

Many people are not aware, that in the UK it is also illegal for anyone other than a qualified veterinary surgeon to diagnose or even recommend treatment for, anyone else’s animals.

Any health information given on this website should be used in  conjunction with veterinary advice.

We are adding to our library all the time.  Let us know if there are any other topics you would like us to cover.   We love to hear from you!

349 COMMENTS

  1. hi
    my lab is 9 month old . she had her first season and its still going on. she is not eating her food i.e. royal canin and any other food.
    she is happy to eat treats and chicken , eggs. bt sm times too moddy. there is also a foul smell in her urine and hair loss. pls guide as its my first time to have a dog.

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